Pilates for Men – Why Men Should do Pilates

Pilates for Men Islington

Not The Easy Option

‘Rather than being an easy option, Pilates has always been about building strength. Joseph Pilates had a background in self-defence and boxing and opened his “body-conditioning gym” in New York in 1926 to teach people how to achieve strength through better body control.

Elite athletes have long loved it — David Beckham, Andy Murray and Tiger Woods are fans.

Pilates is also incorporated into the training regimens of professional rugby players — the England, Wales and New Zealand rugby union teams rely on its ability to build strength and offset injury.’

Significant Gains in Strength

‘Studies have proved that it works. Last year a paper in the International Journal of Sports, Exercise and Training Science found that men who did a one-hour Pilates class three times a week for ten weeks experienced significant gains in strength that enabled them to improve their step-up and leg-press performance.’

‘Men tend to take it up because of a specific issue such as back pain or tight hamstrings. They are unsure about it working at first because they are used to activity that makes them sweat, but once they see the effects they are more dedicated to it than the women I teach.’

Jo Tuffrey
Pilates Teacher
Danesfield House Hotel and Spa

Reformer Pilates

Reformer Pilates is certainly a great choice when it comes to clean living and reforming your exercise routine. This type of Pilates is equally suitable for people returning to exercise as well as those who are simply looking to add something new to their workout regime.

As it works the body and the mind too, it is ideal for helping you to deal with the pressure and stresses of everyday life.

Pilates can be easily combined with other forms of exercise making it a popular choice with tennis players, runners, golfers and people who are already doing cardio exercise.

Give us a call or pop into the studio to find out all the benefits of Pilates for men.

Article by Peta Bee

Read the full article on The Times website (if you’re not a member you’ll have to register, for free).